Burnhamthorpe Library
Burnhamthorpe Library
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Burnhamthorpe Book Club

Burnhamthorpe Library Book Club
Meets the third Monday of each month from 10:00-11:30a.m.
For more information call: 905-615-4635


2018-2019 Titles

January 15, 2018

One Brother Shy by Terry Fallis

From the two-time winner of the Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour comes a new story about a man tormented by an event from his youth, and the journey he finds himself on to heal and to learn who he is. One Brother Shy is at once poignant and humorous, heartbreaking and heartwarming, and readers will not soon forget Alex MacAskill.
February 12, 2018

Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline

Orphan Train is about the relationship between Molly Ayer and Vivian Daly. Brought together by Molly's community service sentence, 17-year-old Molly learns that she has much more in common with 91-year-old Vivian than she first thought. Both women were orphaned as children and share a similar story. However, Vivian was an orphan during the Great Depression and Molly is an orphan today. Kline tells this enlightening and emotionally engaging story based on true accounts of the Orphan Train Movement in early 20th century America.
March 19, 2018

Piano Maker by Kurt Palka

Set in a Canadian town in the 1930s, it follows Helene Giroux, a mysterious French woman with a troubled past. When she arrives in town, she joins the church as a choirmaster and pianist, dazzling the small community with her talent, and stories of the piano factory her family owned in prewar France. Slowly, pieces of her previous life,: the death of her soldier husband, the destitution she and her daughter faced and the dark past she’s tried to conceal and now she is forced to confront it once and for all.

April 16, 2018

The Ghost Map: the story of London’s most terrifying epidemic – and how it changed science, cities and the modern world by Steven Johnson

Ghost Map is a riveting page-turner about a real-life historical hero Dr. John Snow. It’s the summer of 1854 and London is just emerging as one of the first modern cities in the world. But lacking the infrastructure - garbage removal, clean water, sewers - necessary to support its rapidly expanding population the city has become the perfect breeding ground for a terrifying disease no one knows how to cure As the cholera outbreak takes hold a physician and a local curate are spurred to action-and ultimately solve the most pressing medical riddle of their time. Johnson illuminates the intertwined histories and the nature of scientific inquiry offering powerful explanation of how it has shaped the world we live in.

May 14, 2018

Do not say we have nothing by Madeleine Thien

Master storyteller Madeleine Thien takes us inside an extended family in China, showing us the lives of two successive generations—those who lived through Mao’s Cultural Revolution and their children, who became the students protesting in Tiananmen Square. At the center of this epic story are two young women, Marie and Ai-Ming. Through their relationship Marie strives to piece together the tale of her fractured family in present-day Vancouver, seeking answers in the fragile layers of their collective story.
June 18, 2018

The Painted Girls by Cathy Marie Buchanan

A heartrending, gripping novel set in belle époque Paris and inspired by the real-life model for Degas’s Little Dancer Aged 14 and by the era's most famous criminal trials. Following their father’s sudden death, the Van Goethem sisters find their lives upended. Without his wages, and with the small amount their laundress mother earns disappearing into the absinthe bottle, eviction seems imminent. With few options for work, Marie is dispatched to the Paris Opéra, where she will be trained to enter the famous Ballet and meet Edgar Degas. Her older sister, Antoinette, finds employment—and the love of a dangerous young man—as an extra in a stage adaptation of Émile Zola’s Naturalist masterpiece L’Assommoir. Set at a moment of profound artistic, cultural, and societal change, The Painted Girls is a tale of two remarkable sisters rendered uniquely vulnerable to the darker impulses of “civilized society.”
 
July 16, 2018

Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan

Rachel Chu is happy to accompany her longtime boyfriend, Nick, to his best friend's wedding in Singapore. She's also surprised to learn that Nick's family is extremely wealthy and he's considered one of the country's most eligible bachelors. Thrust into the spotlight, Rachel must now contend with jealous socialites, quirky relatives and something far, far worse -- Nick's disapproving mother.
  August 20, 2018

The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George

Monsieur Perdu calls himself a literary apothecary. From his floating bookstore in a barge on the Seine, he prescribes novels for the hardships of life. Using his intuitive feel for the exact book a reader needs, Perdu mends broken hearts and souls. The only person he can't seem to heal through literature is himself; he's still haunted by heartbreak after his great love disappeared. She left him with only a letter, which he has never opened. Perdu is finally tempted to read the letter, hoping to make peace with his loss and discover the end of the story.
 
September 17, 2018

The Golden Son by Shilpi Somaya Gowda

The first of his family to go to college, Anil Patel, the golden son, carries the weight of tradition and his family’s expectations when he leaves his tiny Indian village to begin a medical residency in Dallas, Texas. When his father dies, Anil becomes the de facto head of the Patel household and inherits the mantle of arbiter for all of the village’s disputes. But he is uneasy with the custom, uncertain that he has the wisdom and courage demonstrated by his father and grandfather. His doubts are compounded by the difficulties he discovers in adjusting to a new culture and a new job, challenges that will shake his confidence in himself and his abilities.
  October 15, 2018

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

From the highly acclaimed, multiple award-winning Anthony Doerr, a stunningly ambitious and beautiful novel about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths collide in occupied France as both try to survive the devastation of World War II. Doerr illuminates the ways, against all odds, people try to be good to one another.
  November 19, 2018

The Break by Katerena Vermette

When Stella, a young Métis mother, looks out her window one evening and spots someone in trouble on the Break — a barren field on an isolated strip of land outside her house — she calls the police to alert them to a possible crime. In a series of shifting narratives, people who are connected, both directly and indirectly, with the victim — police, family, and friends — tell their personal stories leading up to that fateful night.
December 17, 2018

The Alice Network by Kate Quinn

In an enthralling new historical novel from national bestselling author Kate Quinn, two women—a female spy recruited to the real-life Alice Network in France during World War I and an unconventional American socialite searching for her cousin in 1947—are brought together in a mesmerizing story of courage and redemption.

  January 21, 2019

A man called Ove by Fredrik Backman

A grumpy, yet loveable man finds his solitary world turned on its head when a boisterous young family moves in next door. Ove is a curmudgeon, the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him the bitter neighbor from hell, but must Ove be bitter just because he doesn't walk around with a smile plastered to his face all the time?

 






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