HSH - Prevention

PREVENTION:

Cooking

Learn about fire safety. It is your responsibility.

Most common type of a fire in your home is a kitchen fire. The leading cause of fires in the home is unattended cooking. Kitchen fires can be prevented.  "Watch What You Heat!"




  • Stay in the kitchen and watch what you heat.
  • Things that can burn such as: paper towels or tea towels should always be kept away from the stove.
  • Turn handles inward when cooking to avoid hot spills.
  • If you have young children, keep them away from the cooking area and for added safety, cook on the back burners first.
  • To extinguish a small grease/oil fire, always keep a lid and oven mitts nearby when you're cooking to smother the fire (carefully slide a lid over the pan to extinguish the flames and turn off the burner; don't move the pan and keep the lid on until the pan cools completely). Never use flour or water as it spreads the flames. If you have a fire in the oven or in the microwave, keep the door closed and turn off the heat.

Additional Safety Tips:

Fire Prevention Canada's fact sheet - "Cooking precautions"

Fire Prevention Canada's video about a cooking fire

OFMEM's Infographic - "Cooking Fire Safety"

NFPA's Cooking Infographic

NFPA's safety tips and videos - "Cooking Safety"

NFPA's tip sheet - "Cooking Safety"

NFPA's tip sheet - "Microwave Oven Safety"

NFPA's tip sheet - "Thanksgiving Safety"

NFPA's tip sheet - "Shabbat Fire Safety"

 

 

Heating Equipment

Space Heaters

"Remember, space heaters need space!"


Keep anything that can burn at least three feet (one metre) away from any heating equipment such as: a furnace, wood stove, fire place or space heater.


Additional Safety Tips:

NFPA's tip sheet - "Heating Safety"

NFPA's tip sheet - "Portable Space Heater Safety"

NFPA's tip sheet - "Electrical Safety"

NFPA's tip sheet - "Generator Safety"

OFMEM's Infographic - "Heating Fire Safety"

 

 

Electrical Safety

Dangers of Overloaded Circuits

Have a licensed electrical contractor make repairs or additions to your electrical system.  Extension cords are not intended to be permanent wiring.  Use a good quality power bar with its own circuit breaker.  Do not place cords under carpets or across door ways.  Never overload circuits.


All major appliances (i.e. fridge, dryer) should be plugged directly into the wall outlet.  Unplug any heat producing appliances when not in use (i.e. space heater, kettle, curling iron, etc.).


Always use light bulbs that match the recommended wattage on the fixture.  Never leave anything flammable hanging over a lamp shade as that item can heat up quickly and turn into a big fire.

 

Additional Safety Tips:

Fire Prevention Canada's video about an overloaded socket

OFMEM's safety tips - "Safe Use of Household Clothes Dryers"

OFMEM's Infographic -"Electrical Fire Safety"

NFPA's tip sheet - "Clothes Dryer Safety"

NFPA's tip sheet - "Electrical Safety"

NFPA's tip sheet - "Outdoor Electrical Safety"

NFPA's tip sheet - "Generator Safety"

NFPA's tip sheet - "CFL Light Bulb Safety"

NFPA's tip sheet - "Hover Board Safety"

 

 

Smoker's Materials

Cigarettes and Fire Safety

If you smoke, smoke outside.  Never smoke in bed or smoke if you are impaired by alcohol, medication or drugs. Use deep, sturdy ashtrays.  Dispose of hot ashes properly - wet them down/put in a large tin can or sand. Never butt out in flower pots, especially those containing peat moss and/or mulch as they are highly combustible.


Do not smoke in a house where portable medical oxygen is used. Keep oxygen cylinders at least five (5) feet from a heat source, open flames or electrical devices.


Additional Safety Tips:

NFPA's tip sheet - "Smoking & Home Fire Safety"

OFMEM's Infographic - "Smoking Fire Safety"

Fire Prevention Canada's video about smoking

NFPA's tip sheet - "Medical Oxygen Safety"

 

 

Lighters and Matches

Keep Your Children Safe by Teaching them Fire Safety

Children have a natural curiosity about fire and are tempted to play with matches and/or lighters that are left within their reach. Keep matches and/or lighters away from children. Store them up high, preferably in a locked cabinet. Teach children that matches and lighters are "tools", not toys, and must only be used by adults.


If you have a child who plays with lighters/matches or has set fires, please contact our Tapp-C program (The Arson Prevention Program for Children) and view our pamphlet:  "TAPP-C".

Additional Safety Tips:

NFPA's tip sheet - "Young Firesetters"

Safe Kids video - "Can You Stop Children from Playing with Fire?"

NFPA's video - "Stop, Drop and Roll"


 

Candle Safety

Candle Safety

Never leave candles unattended while they are burning. Extinguish all candles when you leave any room, when you leave your home or when you go to sleep. Use sturdy non-combustible candle holders and never leave candles where young children or pets could knock them over. Consider using battery-operated flameless candles instead, which can look, smell and feel like real candles.


Additional Safety Tips:

Fire Prevention Canada's fact sheet - "Candle Facts"

Fire Prevention Canada's video about candles

NFPA's tip sheet - "Candle Safety"

NFPA's tip sheet - "Religious Candle Safety"

NFPA's tip sheet - "Pet Fire Safety"


 

Fire Extinguishers

Fire Extinguishers

Install fire extinguishers where they are visible and accessible, preferably near an exit and not wihin ten (10) feet of a potential source of a fire.  Do not store them in closets or under sinks. Only attempt to extinguish a fire if it is small, is not spreading and it doesn't pose a threat to you.  Make sure that everyone has evacuated and that 911 have already been called. Never put the fire between yourself and your way out. Know when and how to operate your extinguisher.


Remember the word PASS when using a fire extinguisher: Pull the pin, Aim low at the base of the fire, Squeeze the handles together and Sweep the nozzle from side to side. Once the fire extinguisher has been used, it must be serviced (MFES does not provide this recharge service) and replace disposable models after every use. Inspect portable extinguishers monthly and have them serviced annually.  View our pamphlet:  "The ABC's of Home Fire Extinguishers".

 

Additional Safety Tips:

Fire Prevention Canada's fact sheet - "Fire Extinguishers"

Fire Prevention Canada's fact sheet - "Safety Tips For The Home"

NFPA's tip sheet - "Fire Safety in Manufactured Homes"

Safe Kids Top Safety Tips

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