Home
City Hall
Residents
Business
Discover Mississauga
Services Online
Help & Feedback
City Home Page - Old VersionHome CalendarAlert BulletinCity AlertsGeneral InformationGet Involved With Local Government
Mississauga Transitway
Routes and Schedules
Click n' Ride
Maps
Service Changes
Fares
Accessible Service
Ride Safely
In the Community
Alerts
Contact Us
 
 
 

About the Mississauga Transitway

The new Mississauga Transitway will provide more efficient and more reliable east-west transit service on a dedicated corridor when fully complete. The construction of the transitway is well underway with phase 1 from the City Centre to Dixie Station scheduled to open in 2014.

When complete, the 18-kilometre transitway will have twelve new stations beginning at Winston Churchill Boulevard in the west and ending at Renforth Drive in the east.

New Transitway Stations

Winston Churchill Dixie
Erin Mills Tahoe
City Centre Transit Terminal Etobicoke Creek
Central Parkway Spectrum
Cawthra Orbitor
Tomken Renforth Gateway

 

Station Opening


Phase 1

Four new stations including Central Parkway, Cawthra Road, Tomken Road and Dixie Road will be operational in 2014. MiWay will transition onto the transitway and provide east-west service and north-south connections between City Centre Transit Terminal and Dixie Road. View the full transitway map and see the phase 1 service plan.

Phase 2

Six new stations including Erin Mills, Winston Churchill, Tahoe, Etobicoke Creek, Spectrum, Orbitor will be operational in 2016. Renforth Gateway will be operational in 2017.

To find out more about the stations click here.

 

Connecting to the Kipling Mobility Hub

The final Mississauga Transitway station will connect to the Kipling Mobility Hub in Etobicoke – connecting TTC passengers to MiWay and Mississauga.

To learn more about the Kipling Mobility Hub, click here.

 

Benefits and Background

Benefits of the Mississauga Transitway

  1. Increased Reliability 
    On the transitway, your trip is less likely to be affected by traffic congestion, so you'll get where you need to go on time.
  2. Reduced Travel Time
    Your trip time on the transitway will be faster in comparison to current transit options and travel by car. You'll spend less time commuting and more time doing the things you want to do. [1]
  3. Greater Convenience and Comfort
    Improved security and protection from the elements mean a more comfortable ride. Improved service information will provide you with the peace of mind and the convenience you want.
  4. Greater Accessibility
    More transit means more and better options for those without access to a car. People with a car may start to leave it at home.

[1] Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund Submission, March 2007

Making Communities Better

The transitway will help make Mississauga and surrounding communities better through:

  1. Reduced Automobile Traffic
    It is projected that the transitway will divert thousands of riders a day from private automobiles to higher-order transit, reducing automobile traffic significantly during high-volume periods.[2]
  2. Reduced Emissions
    With vehicle emissions contributing significantly to climate change; reduced traffic means better air for everyone.[3]
  3. Efficient Use of Road Space
    Mississauga will be able to move significantly more people without having to add to the costly public road network.[4]
  4. Increased Safety
    Public transit is the safest form of transportation. The rates of injury or death due to accidents are significantly lower for public transit users than for drivers of automobiles. [5]
  5. Increased Density
    The Mississauga Transitway will support increased intensity and density of development along the corridor through Mississauga and the GTA, supporting the healthy growth of residential and employment centres.

[2-5] Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund Submission, March 2007

History

Estimates indicate that over the next 30 years, the number of people living in Ontario will grow by as many as four million - with the majority living in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Our GTA transportation infrastructure is already strained to the limit to support current levels of population and movement.

The construction of the Mississauga Transitway is part of Ontario's Smart Growth Plan for development of the GTA, and the City's Transit Ridership Growth Strategy, which establishes a five-year target of achieving a 25% increase in the use of higher-order transit in Mississauga.

Planning between the City, GO Transit and the provincial and federal governments began in the mid-1990. The total cost of the transitway construction is estimated at $259 million.

Connecting people and places

A precursor service operated by GO Transit opened in 2003 using dedicated Bus Bypass Shoulders (BBS) on Highway 403 from Erin Mills Parkway to Mavis Road. The service has saved up to 10 minutes per trip during peak times, and GO ridership has grown from 4,000 to 12,000 riders per day since 2003.

Recent estimates indicate that over the next 30 years, the number of people living in Ontario will grow by as many as four million – with the majority locating in the Greater Toronto Area. Our transportation infrastructure is already strained to the limit to support current levels of population and movement, so other solutions are required.

The transitway will support extensive express bus service for thousands of riders per day, making it faster and easier to travel to, from and through Mississauga and the GTA. It will play an important role in the continued evolution of the GTA, Canada's largest population and business centre. Mississauga's role in this development is pivotal due to:

  • Location: Mississauga is strategically located between Halton Region to the west, Brampton to the north, and Metro Toronto to the east, effectively forming the hub for all travel in the western half of the GTA.
  • Integration: MiWay's ties in directly to the transit systems of its neighbouring municipalities. It is served by GO trains on three different rail lines, as well as numerous GO buses. Mississauga is also home to Canada's largest international airport.
  • Population: Mississauga is home to more than 740,000 people, many of whom need to travel quickly and safely within Mississauga and into neighbouring jurisdictions each day.
  • Business: Mississauga is a major employment centre for industry and commerce, home to more corporate head offices than any other jurisdiction in Canada.

Construction

The City of Mississauga is responsible for the construction of the Mississauga Transitway east from the City Centre to Renforth station (Commerce Blvd.). The transitway stations with Park and Ride lots will be built at Cawthra Road and Dixie Road. Additional transitway stations will be constructed at Tomken Road, Tahoe Boulevard, Etobicoke Creek, Spectrum Way and Orbiter Drive.

The Renforth Gateway station and transitway connection from Commerce Boulevard to east of Matheson Boulevard onto Eglinton Avenue in Toronto will be the responsibility of GO Transit.

The City has undergone a series of extensive provincial environmental assessments evaluating the physical, socio-cultural and economic impacts of the construction and operation of the transitway. The results have been very favourable. The project has received Federal Environmental Assessment approval in accordance with the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (CEAA) as part of the Federal funding requirements. All efforts will be made throughout development and implementation to ensure that any negative impacts are minimized, such as using construction techniques that reduce our impact on the environment.

To learn more, click here

Funding

Total costs for completion of the Mississauga portion of the system are approximately $259 million which is equitably funded by the Government of Canada, the Province of Ontario, GO Transit and the City of Mississauga. The Province and the Federal Government have already committed $173 million to the development of the Mississauga Transitway because they understand its importance to the economic and social fabric of the GTA and, ultimately, the country as a whole. The City of Mississauga has also received budget approval for its share of the development and operating costs as part of its overall transit strategy.

User fares will go towards the operating costs of the service. While fare structures have not yet been determined, projections indicate that the cost of using the transitway will be less than the cost of maintaining and fueling a private automobile for the same amount of travel. You won't just save time on the transitway, you'll save money, too.

 

pcomapp01:8851