City of Mississauga Parks and Forestry - Vimy Ridge

Remembering Vimy

April 9, 2017, marked the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge during World War I. Canada’s success at the Battle of Vimy Ridge during World War I helped to unify our young country in 1917; however, it was not without the sacrifice of the lives of nearly 3,600 Canadians at Vimy Ridge.

Vimy Park

Vimy Park Renaming Ceremony

Mayor Bonnie Crombie and Members of Council invite you to the official re-naming of Cenotaph Park to Vimy Park. This event is in honour of the 100th anniversary of the Battle
of Vimy Ridge.

2:00-4:00 pm
Saturday, October 28, 2017
29 Stavebank Rd N, Mississauga

Parking will be available at the nearby Port Credit Arena and Port Credit Library.

Commemorative Mural

A commemorative mural was created and installed at Mississauga’s Garry W. Morden Training Centre to commemorate the 100th Anniversary of Vimy as well as to honour those who sacrificed their lives for the freedoms we enjoy today. A collection of images relating to both the Battle of Vimy Ridge and World War I are featured in the mural’s design.

Volunteers painted this mural over the course of four days through a controlled painting workshop. Watch the timelpase video below to see the mural transform before your eyes!

Remembering the Fallen

The following seven soldiers from Mississauga gave their lives in service to our country during World War I.

Dennis Ainger

75th Battalion - Killed in Action March 1, 1917


Dennis Ainger was born on January 11, 1893, in Norfolk, England, to George and Sophia Ainger. He immigrated to Canada in 1912, and found work as a farmhand near Erindale in 1913, where he attended St. Peter’s Anglican Church.

Dennis enlisted with the Canadian Expeditionary Force on August 2, 1915. As a Private, he was posted with the 75th Battalion of the Canadian Infantry, Central Ontario Regiment. His attestation papers indicate that he was 5’6" tall, of fair complexion, with blue eyes and brown hair.

Private Ainger was killed in action on March 1, 1917, during an intelligence raid prior to the Battle of Vimy Ridge at age 24, and is buried in the Zouave Valley Cemetery in Souchez, France.

James Fawcett

4th Battalion - Killed in Action April 11, 1917


James Fawcett was born April 8, 1889, in Streetsville, Ontario, to Alexander Robert Fawcett and Margaret Carberry. Howard, as he liked to be called, was a Journalist and a renowned hockey and lacrosse player. His brother Robert Cecil Fawcett fought with a Canadian Highland Battalion and his father was the editor of the Review, the first weekly newspaper publication between Toronto and Windsor.

James fought with the 4th Battalion and died of his wounds at Vimy Ridge April 11, 1917, from a gunshot wound to his left arm and right leg. James is buried at Aubigny Communal Cemetery in Arras, France.

John (Jack) Young

2nd Battalion - Killed in Action April 11, 1917


John Young was born March 3, 1897, in Liverpool, Lancashire, England. On John¿s Attestation Papers his brother Walter Young is stated as his next of kin. Prior to World War I, John’s trade was a Farmer. He was 5’5”, had a dark complexion, blue eyes and dark brown hair.

Private Young was living in Clarkson when he enlisted on September 4, 1915, in Toronto and joined the 2nd Canadian Infantry Battalion, Central Ontario Regiment.

John’s regiment would have seen action at the Somme, Ypres, Arras and Vimy Ridge. He is buried in the Bois Carre British Cemetery in Pas de Calais, France.

Joseph Clarke

75th Battalion - Killed in Action April 9, 1917


Joseph Clarke was born in Devonshire, England, on October 25, 1886. He later immigrated without family to Streetsville, where he was working as a cook when he enlisted with the 170th Battalion in May 1916.

Joseph was fighting near Arras, France, with the 75th Battalion when he was killed in action by shell fire during an attack on enemy trenches. He is buried at Canadian Cemetery No. 2 in Neuville-St. Vaast, France.

William Walter Kidd

3rd Battalion - Killed in Action April 9, 1917


William Walter Kidd was born August 27, 1885, to Sarah Kidd in Norfolk, England. According to his Attestation Papers, his trade is listed as Gardener. He was five foot ten inches, fresh complexion, brown eyes and dark brown hair.

Private Kidd enlisted December 15, 1915, in Toronto, and joined the Canadian Infantry 3rd Battalion. William’s regiment would have seen action at the Somme, Ypres, Arras and Vimy Ridge.

William Walter Kidd was killed in action on April 9, 1917, and is buried at Bois Carre, British Cemetery in Pas de Calais, France.

Eli Rossiter

Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry - Died of Wounds April 10, 1917


Eli Rossiter was born on February 22, 1885, in West Comforth County, Durham, England, to parents Eli and Jane Rossiter. He immigrated to Canada, where he married Hannah Godfrey of Riceville, Pennsylvania. They lived together in Clarkson, where Eli worked as a labourer and miner prior to enlisting in Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry in December 1915.

According to his attestation papers, he was 5’1” with fair skin, blue eyes and light hair.

Private Rossiter was killed in action on April 9, 1917. He died of wounds in the field during an attack south of Thelus, France. He is buried at Givenchy Road Canadian Cemetery (Canadian Cemetery No. 2) in Neuville-St.Vaast, France.

Thomas Cartwright

75th Battalion - Killed in Action April 9, 1917


Thomas Cartwright was born in England on September 8, 1886, to Joseph and Susan Cartwright. Thomas came to Canada around 1912, and found work as a farmhand, first in Halton and then in Erindale.

He attended St. Peter’s Anglican Church, was a member of the Erindale baseball team, and served with the 36th Peel Active Militia.

Thomas enlisted with the 75th Battalion of the Canadian Infantry on July 20, 1915, in Toronto. According to his attestation papers, Thomas was 5’7”, with brown hair, blue eyes, and a fair complexion. He trained at the Exhibition Camp in the winter of 1915, and went overseas in March of 1916.

Thomas fought in the trenches for about two years and attained the rank of Sergeant before he was killed in action on April 9, 1917 at the battle of Vimy Ridge at the age of 21. He is buried in the Zouave Valley Cemetery in Souchez, France.

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