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Mississauga was presented with an exciting opportunity to revitalize its infrastructure and stimulate the local economy, thanks to an allocation of $145 million in funding under the federal and provincial government's infrastructure Stimulus Fund (ISF) program, plus $24 million for Recreational Infrastructure Canada (RInC) projects.

This project was archived on September 24, 2020

The following information will no longer be updated. It remains for reference only.

In July 2012, all 153 of the City’s projects were completed on time and on budget. Projects included developing Mississauga Celebration Square (downtown square), renovating libraries, building and refurbishing pools, roads, sidewalks, noise walls, park pathways and lighting, stormwater management, transit priority lanes, and improving the Hershey Centre.

Funding Programs

Infrastructure Stimulus Fund (ISF)
On June 5, 2009, the Canadian and Ontario governments announced a joint investment of $1.85 billion for infrastructure projects to create jobs and help stimulate the economy. For municipal projects, the federal and provincial governments will each contribute up to one-third of eligible costs, with municipalities contributing one third, so that all parties equally share the total project costs. Projects focus largely on the rehabilitation of existing assets such as water, wastewater, public transit, highways, roads, culture, parks and trails. Mississauga’s approved 132 ISF projects must be completed by October 31, 2011 to be eligible for funding.

For details see ISF Guide

Recreational Infrastructure Canada (RInC)
On June 26, 2009 the Canadian and Ontario governments announced an investment of more than $380 million in recreational infrastructure projects over a two-year period. Each level of government is contributing up to one-third of a project’s eligible cost up to a maximum of $1 million each, per project, with recipients providing the balance. Mississauga has received funding for six outdoor pools. Construction will begin in March 2010 and must be materially completed by October 31, 2011 to be eligible.

For details see www.rinc-on.ca

Library Projects

Project details:

  • Estimated cost: $16.6 million
  • Architect: ZAS Architects
  • Contractor: PCL Constructors

Background

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain its infrastructure for its citizens and for generations to come. A sound, functional and attractive infrastructure is integral in completing its neighbourhoods, as we build a City for the 21st century.

The Burnhamthorpe Branch Library, which serves a local population of over 60,000 residents, is located in a community with significant newcomer populations. Constructed in 1974, the award-winning building houses a public library, 201-seat theatre, meeting rooms, and storage space, and provides a wide range of services.

Objectives and benefits

The renovation project will address lifecycle maintenance needs, modernization of library space, accessibility barriers, consolidation of service points, introduction of self-service technology, a redesign of the entrance and lobby as multiuse spaces, improved exterior linkages to surrounding parkland and amenities and enable a partnership with Dixie Bloor Neighbourhood Centre.

Redevelopment of the Burnhamthorpe Branch Library will address lifecycle maintenance needs to extend the life of the building by 25 years, including replacement of roof, lobby windows, public washroom fixtures and carpets; upgrades to HVAC system and fire systems; green technologies for energy efficiencies.

To be more effective at meeting the needs of it users, library space will be modernized; service points consolidated; self-service technology introduced; entrance and lobby space redesigned; accessibility barriers addressed; parking lot flow corrected; linkages to surrounding parkland and amenities improved. Space will also be created to permit a partnership between the Burnhamthorpe Branch Library and Dixie Bloor Neighbourhood Centre to develop a community hub for residents and provide opportunities for joint programming and cost sharing.

For a glimpse of the new library click on: Project Drawings

Project details:

  • Estimated cost: $2.5 million
  • Project Management: MHPM Project Managers Inc.
  • Architect: Rounthwaite Dick and Hadley Architect Inc.
  • Contractor: Brown Daniels Associates

Background

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain its infrastructure for its citizens and for generations to come. A sound, functional and attractive infrastructure is integral in completing its neighbourhoods, as we build a City for the 21st century.

The 2004 Library Master Plan called for the redevelopment of Lakeview Branch Library, due to age, mechanical lifecycle issues and functionality. The library opened in 1967 with an addition built in 1974 and further renovations in 1990. The 7,610-foot facility services 22,000 local residents.

A renovation program for this older facility in the south of Mississauga has been reviewed and is ready for implementation.

Objectives and benefits

The scope of work includes addressing replacement of HVAC, sanitary piping, improved air distribution, replacement of baseboard heaters and fan-forced electric heaters, removal of stable asbestos, skylight and support replacement, window and door replacement, replacement of carpet and flooring, painting, replacement of circulation desk, shelving, tables and chairs, reconfigure workspace, program room and storage space, reconfigure public washrooms to meet Mississauga Accessibility Design guidelines, install energy efficient technology due to high utility rates, provide standard interior and exterior signage, improve customer entrance including covered vestibule, introduce interior and exterior Closed Circuit Television, improve public computer workspace configuration and add a quiet study room and vending hut.

Renovation of Lakeview Branch Library will enable the building to remain in good repair while meeting customer needs. The economic life of the building will be extended; energy savings will be realized, a new HVAC system will improve air quality; washrooms will be improved, exterior ramps will be replaced to address accessibility issues, closed circuit television will increase safety; staff workspaces will be designed to accommodate today’s technology; customers will have an updated, welcoming facility to gather, borrow materials and use resources. Renovations will also address the changing demographics and the electronic needs of customers.

For a glimpse of the new library click on: Project Drawings

Project details:

  • Estimated cost: $4 million
  • Project Management: MHPM Project Managers Inc.
  • Architect: Rounthwaite Dick and Hadley Architect Inc.
  • Contractor: Brown Daniels Associates

Background

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain its infrastructure for its citizens and for generations to come. A sound, functional and attractive infrastructure is integral in completing its neighbourhoods, as we build a City for the 21st century.

The 2004 Library Master Plan called for the redevelopment of the Lorne Park Branch Library due to age, mechanical lifecycle issues and functionality. The original structure opened in 1967 with an addition built in 1974 and further renovations in 1988/89. The 12,000-foot facility services 23,000 local residents.

A renovation program for this older facility in the south of Mississauga has been reviewed and is ready for implementation.

Objectives and benefits

The scope of work includes addressing sanitary piping, improved air distribution, replacement of baseboard heaters and fan-forced electric heaters, window replacement, interior lighting deficiencies, interior and exterior Closed Circuit Television, circulation area modifications, signs, shelving, painting, and the addition of a quiet study room and reconfiguration of the staff workplace.

Renovations of Lorne Park Branch Library will enable the building to remain in good repair while meeting customer needs. The economic life of the building will be extended; energy savings will be realized, air quality improvements would benefit customers and staff, closed circuit television will increase safety; staff workspaces will be designed to accommodate today’s technology; customers will have an updated, welcoming facility to gather, borrow materials and use resources. Increased library usage is expected as a result of physical improvements to the building, benefiting residents, especially youth and older adults.

For a glimpse of the new library, please click on: Project Drawings

Project details:

  • Estimated cost: $3.1 million
  • Project Management: MHPM Project Managers Inc.
  • Architect: Rounthwaite Dick and Hadley Architect Inc.
  • Contractor: Brown Daniels Associates

Background

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain its infrastructure for its citizens and for generations to come. A sound, functional and attractive infrastructure is integral in completing its neighbourhoods, as we build a City for the 21st century.

The 2004 Library Master Plan called for the redevelopment of the Port Credit Branch Library, due to age, mechanical lifecycle issues and functionality. Opened in 1962, further renovations took place in 1992. Located in historic Port Credit, along the banks of the Credit River in beautiful Port Credit Memorial Park, this library services 60,000 local residents.

A renovation program for this 7,600 square foot, older facility in the south of Mississauga has been reviewed and is ready for implementation.

Objectives and benefits

Components of the project include upgrades to roof, windows, HVAC, water and sewer piping and carpet, interior and exterior Closed Circuit Television, circulation area modifications, replacement of aged furnishings, signs and shelving, painting, addition of a quiet study room and reconfiguration of the staff workplace.

Renovations of the Port Credit Branch Library will enable the building to remain in good repair while meeting customer needs. The economic life of the building will be extended; energy savings will be realized, a new HVAC system will improve air quality; washrooms will be improved, exterior ramps will be replaced to address accessibility issues, closed circuit television will increase safety; staff workspaces will be designed to accommodate today’s technology; customers will have an updated, welcoming facility to gather, borrow materials and use resources. Renovations will also address the changing demographics and the electronic needs of customers.

For a glimpse of the new library click on: Project Drawings

Background

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain its infrastructure for its citizens and for generations to come. A sound, functional and attractive infrastructure is integral in completing its neighbourhoods, as we build a City for the 21st century.

The Burnhamthorpe Branch Library, which serves a local population of over 60,000 residents, is located in a community with significant newcomer populations. Constructed in 1974, the award-winning building houses a public library, 201-seat theatre, meeting rooms, and storage space, and provides a wide range of services.

Project details

  • Estimated cost: $16.6 million
  • Architect: ZAS Architects
  • Contractor: PCL Constructors

Background

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain its infrastructure for its citizens and for generations to come. A sound, functional and attractive infrastructure is integral in completing its neighbourhoods, as we build a City for the 21st century.

The Burnhamthorpe Branch Library, which serves a local population of over 60,000 residents, is located in a community with significant newcomer populations. Constructed in 1974, the award-winning building houses a public library, 201-seat theatre, meeting rooms, and storage space, and provides a wide range of services.

Objectives and benefits

The renovation project will address lifecycle maintenance needs, modernization of library space, accessibility barriers, consolidation of service points, introduction of self-service technology, a redesign of the entrance and lobby as multiuse spaces, improved exterior linkages to surrounding parkland and amenities and enable a partnership with Dixie Bloor Neighbourhood Centre.

Redevelopment of the Burnhamthorpe Branch Library will address lifecycle maintenance needs to extend the life of the building by 25 years, including replacement of roof, lobby windows, public washroom fixtures and carpets; upgrades to HVAC system and fire systems; green technologies for energy efficiencies.

To be more effective at meeting the needs of it users, library space will be modernized; service points consolidated; self-service technology introduced; entrance and lobby space redesigned; accessibility barriers addressed; parking lot flow corrected; linkages to surrounding parkland and amenities improved. Space will also be created to permit a partnership between the Burnhamthorpe Branch Library and Dixie Bloor Neighbourhood Centre to develop a community hub for residents and provide opportunities for joint programming and cost sharing.

For a glimpse of the new library click on:
Project Drawings

Drawings

Status

December 2011

Information below is current as of the date identified. Information, including the date and status for each phase may change throughout the project. Updates will be posted once a month.

Project timeline

  • Consultant contract, June 2009 – Complete
  • Pre-design, July 2009 – Complete
  • Design development, August 2009 – Complete
  • Library closure, January 31, 2010 – Complete
  • Tendering, February to December 2010 – Complete
  • Construction start, March 2010 – Complete
  • Construction completion, May 30, 2011 – Complete
  • Open to the public, June 1, 2011 – Complete
  • Official opening event, August 6, 2011 – Complete

Overview

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain its infrastructure for its citizens and for generations to come. A sound, functional and attractive infrastructure is integral in completing its neighbourhoods, as we build a City for the 21st century.

Studies show that swimming is one of the most popular leisure activities with 90 per cent of children/youth and 56 per cent of the adult population participating. City-wide population projections show a deficit in aquatic services over the next five years.

The existing indoor Clarkson and Malton pools, which each average 40,000 visits per year, are reaching a life-cycle stage requiring significant capital repair and rehabilitation. Replacement pools will offer an aquatic feature to enhance the appeal of the community centres in these neighbourhoods.

The outdoor pools range in age from 33 to 56 years old. Despite vigorous maintenance programs, these pools have reached a stage of lifecycle where significant capital repair and rehabilitation are required. Therefore, necessary pool tank repairs, deck rehabilitation and building renovation will significantly expand the pools’ lifespan.

Objectives and benefits

The existing Clarkson Pool located at Clarkson Secondary School will be replaced with a new 25 metre lap pool and a warmwater therapy/leisure pool attached to the Clarkson Community Centre and Library. The existing Malton Pool located at Lincoln Alexander Secondary School will be replaced with a new leisure pool and therapy pool attached to the Malton Community Centre and Library.

Investing in the two new leisure oriented indoor pools attached to multi-use community centres will generate a number of benefits for the community including energy efficient systems which will allow a reduction in energy consumption and improved efficiencies; accessible facilities that meet current standards; double the number of pool uses (to 80,000 uses per year); better service changing demographics; enhance the appeal of the existing facility; increase the number of visits to the community centre and library sections of the facility; and, continue to service nearby student populations.

Re-investing in the six outdoor pools will reduce energy consumption and improve water usage efficiency through necessary repairs to the pool tank and filtration system; improve accessibility and meet current standards; provide a shaded area for patrons; continue to provide a facility that can meet the demands of changing demographics; enhance the appeal of the existing facility; and, increase the number of visits due to the modern design and amenities.

Through planned improvements, the lifespan of the outdoor pools is expected to increase by a minimum of 25 years.

Project details

Status

December 2011

Information below is current as of the date identified. Information, including the date and status for each phase may change throughout the project. Updates will be posted once a month.

Project timeline

  • Consultant sourced, June 2009 – Complete
  • Construction manager sourced, June 2009 – Complete
  • Program development, June 2009 – Complete
  • Schematic design, August 2009 – Complete
  • Design development, August to November 2009 – Complete
  • Site plan approval, November 2009 – Complete
  • Tendering, March 2010 – Complete
  • Construction start, March 2010 – Complete
  • Construction completion, May 30, 2011 – Complete
  • Open to the public, June 18, 2011 – Complete
  • Official opening event, June 18, 2011 – Complete

 

Background

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain its infrastructure for its citizens for generations to come. Sound, functional and attractive buildings, facilities, roads, transit, public and open spaces are integral to completing our neighbourhoods as we build a City for the 21st century.

Don McLean Westacres Outdoor Pool is 47 years old and serves approximately 85,000 residents and is the last of the City’s outdoor pools to be redeveloped. Construction will update the pool’s mechanical systems to increase its lifecycle, efficient use of energy and water, and improve accessibility for residents of all ages.

Project details

Objectives and benefits

Reinvesting in the redevelopment of the existing outdoor pool and building will significantly expand the outdoor pool’s lifespan, and will include:

  • Updating facility change rooms and washrooms
  • Replacing the pool tank
  • Bringing the facility to Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards
  • Providing two barrier-free parking spaces
  • Upgrading site services
  • Replacing the pool deck

This investment will generate a number of benefits for the community with enhancements that will include:

  • Improved energy efficiency
  • Reduced water consumption by replacing pool tank and filtration system
  • Better accessibility
  • Shaded area for pool users
  • Increased use by area residents due to the facility’s new, modern and appealing visual and functional design

The community has committed to raise funds towards the project.

Status

December 2013

Information below is current as of the date identified. Information, including the date and status for each phase may change throughout the project.

Project timeline

  • Consultant sourced, Jan. 2013 – Completed
  • Construction manager sourced, Jan. 2013 – Completed
  • Program development, Feb. 2013 – Completed
  • Schematic design, Feb. 2013 – Completed
  • Design development, Mar. 2013 – Completed
  • Site plan approval, Aug. 2013 – Completed
  • Tendering, Oct. 2013 – Completed
  • Construction start, Mar. 2013 – Completed
  • Construction completion, March 2014, – On Schedule
  • Open to the public, Summer 2014 – On Schedule
  • Official opening event, TBC – To Follow

Construction Photos

 

Project details

Status

December 2011

Information below is current as of the date identified. Information, including the date and status for each phase may change throughout the project. Updates will be posted once a month.

Project timeline

  • Consultant awarded, July 2009 – Complete
  • Program development, July 2009 – Complete
  • Design development, October 2009 to December 2009 – Complete
  • Site plan approvals, November 2009 – Complete
  • Design Sign off, December 2009 – Complete
  • Contractor tender, February 2010 – Complete
  • Contractor awarded, April 2010 – Complete
  • Construction start, April 2010 – Complete
  • Construction completion, May 30, 2011 – Complete
  • Open to the public, June 17, 2011 – Complete
  • Official opening event, July 9, 2011 – Complete

 

Project details

Status

December 2011

Information below is current as of the date identified. Information, including the date and status for each phase may change throughout the project. Updates will be posted once a month.

Project timeline

  • Consultant sourced, June 2009 – Complete
  • Construction manager sourced, June 2009 – Complete
  • Program development, June 2009 – Complete
  • Schematic design, August 2009 – Complete
  • Design development, August 2009 to December 2009 – Complete
  • Site plan approval, November 2009 – Complete
  • Tendering, March 2010 – Complete
  • Construction start, March 2010 – Complete
  • Construction completion, May 30, 2011 – Complete
  • Open to the public, June 18, 2011 – Complete
  • Official opening event June 18, 2011 – Complete

 

Project details

  • Project: Mechanical Equipment Lifecycle Replacement
  • Estimated Cost: $1.0 million
  • Architect: Efficiency Engineering Inc.
  • Contractors: Velocity Mechanical Inc.

Objectives and benefits

Major repair of the facility’s dehumidification and water heating units are necessary to address air quality and hot water supply issues which will require the City to close the pool for an extended period. The closure provides an opportunity to include change room upgrades (replacement of floor and wall tiles) and painting.

Status

December 2013

Information below is current as of the date identified. Information, including the date and status for each phase may change throughout the project.

Project timeline

  • Consultant sourced, Oct. 2012 – Completed
  • Schematic design, Dec. 2012 – Completed
  • Design development, Jan. 2013 – Completed
  • Tendering, Feb. 2013 – Completed
  • Construction start, May 2013 – Completed
  • Construction completion, Aug. 2013 – Completed
  • Open to the public, Sept. 2013 – Completed
  • Official opening event, Sept. 20, 2013 – Completed

 

Project details

Status

December 2011

Information below is current as of the date identified. Information, including the date and status for each phase may change throughout the project. Updates will be posted once a month.

Project timeline

  • Consultant awarded, July 2009 – Complete
  • Program development,  July 2009 – Complete
  • Design development, October 2009 to December 2009 – Complete
  • Site Plan approvals, November 2009 – Complete
  • Design sign-off, December 2009 – Complete
  • Contractor tender, February 2010 – Complete
  • Contractor awarded, April 2010 – Complete
  • Construction start, April 2010 – Complete
  • Construction completion, May 30, 2011 – Complete
  • Open to the public, June 17, 2011 – Complete
  • Official opening event, July 9, 2011 – Complete

 

Background

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain its infrastructure for its citizens for generations to come. Sound, functional and attractive buildings, facilities, roads, transit, public and open spaces are integral to completing our neighbourhoods as we build a City for the 21st century.

River Grove Community Centre was initially opened in September 1996, and has undergone minor repairs and renovations during the last 15 years. It currently is the highest facility for attendance in aquatic programs, membership, drop-in swim programs and rentals. It consists of 67,000 square feet which includes a pool, play pool/hot tub and pool slide, fitness studio with aerobic studio and squash courts, meeting rooms (large auditorium/gymnasium combination) and lobby space.

Project details

  • Estimated Cost: $10.7 million
  • Architect: MacLennan Jaunkalns Miller Architects
  • Contractors: Aquicon Construction Co. Ltd.

Objectives and benefits

A number of factors have made the renovation of this facility a priority including expanding change room and fitness space as well as significant repair of mechanical systems.

The construction program includes a number of mechanical upgrades and enlarging change rooms and fitness facilities to address customer feedback and to meet the growing and changing needs of the community.

Once complete, residents will enjoy the use of a more comfortable and functional facility while the City also realizes the benefit of a more energy efficient facility that is more cost effective to operate.

Shut down is planned in July 2013 and the facility will open again when construction ends in July 2014.

For a glimpse of the project drawings, please click on the link below

River Grove Community Centre

Project details

Status

December 2011

Information below is current as of the date identified. Information, including the date and status for each phase may change throughout the project. Updates will be posted once a month.

Project timeline

  • Consultant awarded, July 2009 – Complete
  • Program development, July 2009 – Complete
  • Design development, October 2009 to December 2009 – Complete
  • Site plan approvals, November 2009 – Complete
  • Design sign-off, December 2009 – Complete
  • Contractor tender, February 2010 – Complete
  • Contractor awarded, April 2010 – Complete
  • Construction start, April 2010 – Complete
  • Construction completion, May 30, 2011 – Complete
  • Open to the public, June 17, 2011 – Complete
  • Official opening event, July 9, 2011 – Complete

 

Project details

Status

December 2011

Information below is current as of the date identified. Information, including the date and status for each phase may change throughout the project. Updates will be posted once a month.

Project timeline

  • Consultant awarded, July 2009 – Complete
  • Program development, July 2009 – Complete
  • Design development, October 2009 to December 2009 – Complete
  • Site plan approvals, November 2009 – Complete
  • Design sign-off, December 2009 – Complete
  • Contractor tender, February 2010 – Complete
  • Contractor awarded, April 2010 – Complete
  • Construction start, April 2010 – Complete
  • Construction completion, May 30, 2011 – Complete
  • Open to the public, June 17, 2011 – Complete
  • Official opening event, July 9, 2011 – Complete

 

Background

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain its infrastructure for its citizens for generations to come. Sound, functional and attractive buildings, facilities, roads, transit, public and open spaces are integral to completing our neighbourhoods as we build a City for the 21st century.

River Grove Community Centre was initially opened in September 1996, and has undergone minor repairs and renovations during the last 15 years. It currently is the highest facility for attendance in aquatic programs, membership, drop-in swim programs and rentals. It consists of 67,000 square feet which includes a pool, play pool/hot tub and pool slide, fitness studio with aerobic studio and squash courts, meeting rooms (large auditorium/gymnasium combination) and lobby space.

Project details

  • Estimated cost: $10.7 million
  • Architect: MacLennan Jaunkalns Miller Architects
  • Contractors: Aquicon Construction Co. Ltd.

Objectives and benefits

A number of factors have made the renovation of this facility a priority including expanding change room and fitness space as well as significant repair of mechanical systems.

The construction program includes a number of mechanical upgrades and enlarging change rooms and fitness facilities to address customer feedback and to meet the growing and changing needs of the community.

Once complete, residents will enjoy the use of a more comfortable and functional facility while the City also realizes the benefit of a more energy efficient facility that is more cost effective to operate.

Shut down is planned in July 2013 and the facility will open again when construction ends in July 2014.

For a glimpse of the project drawings, please click on the link below

River Grove Community Centre
Drawings: Project Drawings

Status

December 2013

Information below is current as of the date identified. Information, including the date and status for each phase may change throughout the project.

Project timeline

  • Consultant sourced, Nov. 2012 – Completed
  • Construction manager sourced, Dec. 2012 – Completed
  • Program development, Oct. 2012 – Completed
  • Schematic design, Feb. 2013 – Completed
  • Design development, June 2013 – Completed
  • Tendering (first), Apr. 2013 – Completed
  • Construction start, July 2013 – On Schedule
  • Construction completion, May 2014 – On Schedule
  • Open to the public, July 2, 2014 – On Schedule
  • Official opening event, Aug.16, 2014 – On Schedule

Link to Construction Photos

Link to Facade Concept Drawings

 

Background

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain its infrastructure for its citizens for generations to come. Sound, functional and attractive buildings, facilities, roads, transit, public and open spaces are integral to completing our neighbourhoods as we build a City for the 21st century.

River Grove Community Centre was initially opened in September 1996, and has undergone minor repairs and renovations during the last 15 years. It currently is the highest facility for attendance in aquatic programs, membership, drop-in swim programs and rentals. It consists of 67,000 square feet which includes a pool, play pool/hot tub and pool slide, fitness studio with aerobic studio and squash courts, meeting rooms (large auditorium/gymnasium combination) and lobby space.

Project detials

  • Estimated cost: $10.7 million
  • Architect: MacLennan Jaunkalns Miller Architects
  • Contractors: Aquicon Construction Co. Ltd.

Objectives and benefits

A number of factors have made the renovation of this facility a priority including expanding change room and fitness space as well as significant repair of mechanical systems.

The construction program includes a number of mechanical upgrades and enlarging change rooms and fitness facilities to address customer feedback and to meet the growing and changing needs of the community.

Once complete, residents will enjoy the use of a more comfortable and functional facility while the City also realizes the benefit of a more energy efficient facility that is more cost effective to operate.

Shut down is planned in July 2013 and the facility will open again when construction ends in July 2014.

Funding Project: RInC Funded Project

Project drawing: Port Credit Pool

Status

December 2011

Information below is current as of the date identified. Information, including the date and status for each phase may change throughout the project. Updates will be posted once a month.

Project timeline

  • Consultant awarded July 2009
  • Program development July 2009
  • Design development October 2009 to December 2009
  • Site plan approvals November 2009
  • Design sign-off December 2009
  • Contractor tender February 2010
  • Contractor awarded April 2010
  • Construction start April 2010
  • Construction completion May 30, 2011
  • Open to the public June 17, 2011
  • Official opening event July 10, 2011

Background

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain its infrastructure for its citizens and for generations to come. A sound, functional and attractive infrastructure is integral in completing its neighbourhoods, as we build a City for the 21st century.

Sections of the municipal road network require rehabilitation as per the City’s two-year program. Required work includes removal and replacement of existing asphalt, improvement/installation of subgrades, replacement of concrete curbing and adjustments to manholes and catchbasins.

Project details:

  • Estimated cost: $26.2 million
  • Contractor
    • Four Seasons Site Development
    • Associated Paving
    • Furfari Paving

Objectives and benefits

This project allows for the rehabilitation of roadways at an optimum point in their life cycle, such that the life of the road will be extended without extensive road reconstruction. This reduces future maintenance and capital cost. This also increases the averaged pavement condition index of the municipal road network, therefore contributing to the effective movement of people and goods, and improving road safety.

Locations:

  • Admiral Boulevard: Hurontario Street to Kennedy Road
  • Aerowood Drive: Ambler Drive to Kamato Road
  • Argentia Road: Derry Road to Mississauga Road
  • Britannia Road East: Hurontario Street to Kennedy Road
  • Burnhamthorpe Road: Creditview Road to Credit River Bridge
  • Creditview Road: Britannia Road to Falconer Drive
  • Creditview Road: Falconer Drive to Old Creditview Road
  • Eglinton Avenue West: Creditview Road to Terry Fox Way
  • Eglinton Avenue West: Erin Mills Parkway to Mississauga Road
  • Haultain Court: Maingate Drive to End
  • Lakeshore Road West: Lorne Park Road to Southdown Road
  • Maingate Drive: Eglinton Avenue to Matheson Boulevard
  • Turney Valley Drive: Argentia Road to Mississauga Road
  • Winston Churchill Boulevard: Dundas Street West to Burnhamthorpe Road
  • Winston Churchill Boulevard: Eglinton Avenue to Derry Road

Project details

  • Estimated cost: $14.5 million
  • Architect: Jain & Associates
  • Contractor
    • Hermans Contracting
    • Mopal Construction
  • Equipment: Aluminous Lighting Products and Spectalume Lighting

Background

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain its infrastructure for its citizens and for generations to come. A sound, functional and attractive infrastructure is integral in completing its neighbourhoods, as we build a City for the 21st century.

Lighted pathways within the parks system are used by pedestrians, cyclists, roller bladers and serve as pedestrian linkages connecting centre of activity, such a schools, public facilities, natural areas, institutions, shopping centres and connections to transportation routes.

Light standards along the City’s parks and trails are past their serviceable life. Some surfaces of pathways are deteriorating and are in need of repair or complete replacement.

Objectives and benefits

The electrical lighting infrastructure will be replaced, including underground wiring and conduit, poles, ballasts, bulb fixtures, etc. Rehabilitation of the pathway will involve reconstruction of pathway drainage and asphalt surface.

The refurbished lighted pathways will provide safe park access and encourage participation in leisure and recreation activities within park settings.

High efficiency bulbs and ballasts with code compliant supply systems will reduce energy consumption.

This project has environmental and safety benefits such as energy savings and avoiding hazardous situations.

Status

  • Consultant RFP, June 2009 – Complete
  • Pre-engineering and schematics, July 2009 – Complete
  • Design development, August 2009 – Complete
  • Tendering, November 2009 to February 2010 – Complete
  • Construction Phase 1 (Wards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7), December 2009 – Complete
  • Construction Phase 2 (Wards 8, 9, 10, 11), March 2010 – Complete
  • Construction Completion, November 2010 to January 2011 – Complete

Locations complete

  • Arbour Green
  • Beechwood Park
  • Ben Machree Park
  • Bloor Athletic Field
  • Bonnie Brea
  • Brandon Gate Park
  • Brentwood Park
  • Brookmede Park
  • Burnhamthorpe Library Grounds
  • Derry Greenway
  • Douglas Kennedy Park
  • Eden Grove
  • Eden Woods
  • Elmcreek Park
  • Fred Halliday Memorial Park
  • Glen Eden Park
  • Glendenning Park
  • Golden Orchard Park
  • Gordon Lummiss Park
  • Hawkins Glen
  • Hiawatha Park
  • Huron Park
  • J.C. Saddington Park
  • J.J. Plaus
  • Kennedy Park
  • Kindree Gate
  • Kings Masting Park
  • Kogaydwin Trail
  • Lake Aquitane
  • Lake Aquitane Trail
  • Lake Wabukayne
  • McCauley Green
  • McKenzie Park
  • Meadow Green
  • Meadowvale Sports Park
  • Millgrove Park
  • Millgrove Trail
  • Northwood Park
  • Pinecliff Park
  • Pinetree Grove Park
  • Plowmans Park
  • Promenade Meadows
  • Rathwood District Park
  • Rayfield Park
  • Richard FC Mortenson Park
  • Richards Memorial Park
  • Sandgate Park
  • Sawmill Valley Trail
  • Serson Park
  • Settlers Green
  • Shalebank Hollow
  • Shaver Trail
  • Shelby Park
  • Sheridan Creek Trail
  • Springbank Meadows
  • Springfield Park
  • Spruce Park
  • Stillmeadows Park
  • Stonebrook Park
  • Taffey Park
  • Thornlodge Park
  • Trappers Green
  • Turney Woods
  • Wakefield Common Park
  • Westwood Park
  • Wildwood Park
  • Windwood Park
  • Windy Hollow
  • Woodeden Park
  • Woodgreen Park
  • Woodhurst Heights
  • Woodington Green
  • Woodland Chase Park

Background

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain its infrastructure for its citizens and for generations to come. A sound, functional and attractive infrastructure is integral in completing its neighbourhoods, as we build a City for the 21st century.

New sections of sidewalks are required to meet provincial guidelines for a fully accessible transit network.

Project details:

  • Estimated cost: $2.4 million
  • Contractor: VBN Paving Limited

Objectives and benefits

This project will result in a fully accessible sidewalk network to all transit stops. Benefits include pedestrian safety and accessibility for all transit users. As part of the City’s multi-modal transportation network, the project also contributes to the reduction of greenhouse gases (transit-supportive) and active transportation (public health benefits).

Locations:

  • Bonhill Road South: Van Deemter Court to Neetherhart Road
  • Britannia Road South: Avebury Road to Hurontario Street
  • Britannia Road South: Ninth Line to Tenth Line
  • Britannia Road South: Winston Churchill Boulevard to Greensboro Drive
  • Brunel Road North: Kennedy Road to Whittle Road
  • Cardiff Boulevard North/South: Derry Road to Lormiar Drive (west leg)
  • Columbus Road East: Midway Boulevard to Derry Road
  • Derry Road South: Edwards Boulevard to Airport Road
  • Derry Road South: McLaughlin Road to Hurontario Street
  • Dixie Road West: Crestlawn Drive to Hickory Drive
  • Freemount Boulevard East: Britannia Road to Cantay Road
  • Hadwen Road West: Meyerside Drive to Bonhill Road
  • Kennedy Road East: Coopers Avenue to Brunel Road
  • Meyerside Drive North: Netherhart Road to Bonhill Road
  • Midway Boulevard South: Columbus Road to Dixie Road

Background

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain its infrastructure for its citizens and for generations to come. A sound, functional and attractive infrastructure is integral in completing its neighbourhoods, as we build a City for the 21st century.

Some of the City’s aging road noise attenuation barriers are in disrepair and require replacement. This project involves removal and disposal of existing barriers, installation of new concrete footings, installation of new concrete noise barriers and property re-grading.

Project details:

  • Estimated cost: $4 million
  • Contractor: International Fence Limited

Objectives and benefits

Replacement of the noise attenuation barriers will ensure public safety and return this infrastructure to a state of good repair. Beyond the aesthetic community improvement, it will ensure compliance with the Ministry of Environment noise attenuation standards.

On January 12, 2011 an additional 14 noise wall projects were approved by the Federal and Provincial governments.

Approved locations:

  • Burnhamthorpe Road, north side – little Etobicoke Creek to Corbet Drive
  • Burnhamthorpe Road, north side – Elora Drive to Confederation Pkwy
  • Burnhamthorpe Road, north side – Tomken Road to Westminister Drive
  • Burnhamthorpe Road, north side – Westminster Drive to Cawthra Road
  • Burnhamthorpe Road, north side – Golden Orchard Drive to Little Etobicoke Creek
  • Burnhamthorpe Road, north side – Cawthra Road to Wilcox Road
  • Burnhamthorpe Road, south side – Golden Orchard Drive to Little Etobicoke Creek
  • Confederation Parkway, west side – Hillcrest Road south 220 metres
  • Eglinton Avenue West, north side – Guildwood Way to Mariner Court
  • Eglinton Avenue West, south side – Wayside Court to Wainscot Drive
  • Mavis Road, west side – Burnhamthorpe Rd. to Hwy 403
  • Mavis Road, west side – Dundas Street West to Paisley Boulevard
  • Rathburn Road West, north side – Corbet Drive to Little Etobicoke Creek
  • Rathburn Road West, north & south side – Queensbridge Drive to Sawgrass Park
  • Rathburn Road West, north side – Mavis Road to Wakefield Crescent
  • Rathburn Road East, south side – Tomken Road to Corbet Drive
  • Rathburn Road West, south side – Mavis Road to Queensbridge Drive
  • Rathburn Road East, Little Etobicoke Creek to 80m east of Hickory Drive
  • Rathburn Road East, north side – Wyatt Court to Golden Orchard Drive
  • Tomken Road, east side – Willowbank Trail to Eastgate Parkway
  • Burnhamthorpe Road West, south side – Credit River to 140 m west of Promontory Crescent
  • Burnhamthorpe Road west, north side – Credit River to 200 m west of Promontory Drive
  • Dundas Street west, south side – 360 m west of Cedarglen Gate to 170 m east of Cedarglen Gate
  • Eglinton Avenue west, south side – Founders walk to Empire Crescent
  • Eglinton Avenue west, north side – Heritage Hills Boulevard to 30 m east of Heritage Hills
  • Eglinton Avenue west, south side – Heritage Hills Boulevard to Founders Walk
  • Eglinton Avenue west, south side – Penhallow Road to Wayside Court
  • Eglinton Avenue west, north side – Silverthorne Crescent to Heritage Hills Bourlvard
  • Eglinton Avenue west, south side – Wainscot Drive to Millworks Crescent
  • Rathburn Road East, south side – Cawthra Road to Willowbank Trail
  • Rathburn Road east, north side – Tomken Road to Starlight Crescent
  • Rathburn Road east, north side – Wyatt Court to Hickory Drive
  • Robert Speck Parkway, east side – Burnhamthorpe Road east to 125 m north of Meadows Boulevard
  • Tomken Road, west side – Burnhamthorpe Road east to Eastgate Parkway

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain its infrastructure for its citizens and for generations to come. A sound, functional and attractive infrastructure is integral in completing its neighbourhoods, as we build a City for the 21st century.

Wastewater facilities, which are designed to remove and collect sediments and other contaminants from local urban stormwater runoff, are very near capacity for sediment collection. Major maintenance is essential to restore stormwater quality treatment function and performance of the facility; to protect the downstream natural water resources and aquatic contaminants associated with urban runoff; and to extend the useful life of the facility.

Project details

  • Estimated cost: $500,000
  • Consultants: Sernas & Associates Limited
  • Contractors: Hollandia Land and Environmental Services

Objectives and benefits

Dredging and rehabilitating the existing stormwater management pond facilities will remove and dispose of accumulated sediments and will re-instate aquatic and upland vegetative plantings within the pond block.

Stormwater quality treatment function will be restored and downstream natural water resources and the aquatic environment will be protected from the release of harmful sediments and other contaminants associated with urban runoff.

The useful life of these facilities will be extended and the City’s capital investment will be protected. Environmental benefits include the protection of downstream aquatic life, habitat, and surface water resources.

This project improves efficiency of the transportation network specifically related to local and inter-regional public transit vehicles in the Mississauga City Centre.

Project details

  • Estimated cost: $5.5 million
  • Consultant: McCormick Rankin Corporation
  • Contractor
    • Rathburn Road: Graham Brothers
    • Mavis Road: Graham Brothers

Background

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain its infrastructure for its citizens and for generations to come. A sound, functional and attractive infrastructure is integral in completing its neighbourhoods, as we build a City for the 21st century.

The Rathburn Road Transit Priority Measures project has been updated with an interim design to provide for new bus stations and shelters along the existing boulevards of Rathburn Road from Hurontario Street to Duke of York Boulevard to accommodate the need to facilitate the transit ridership demands.

This interim design/construction is in advance of the future re-allocation of existing road space between Hurontario Street and Duke of York Boulevard in the Mississauga City Centre that will allow for installation of median reserved bus lanes on Rathburn Road. This project incorporates the existing Mississauga Transit City Centre Terminal as well as the GO Transit Station Gate Terminal.

Objectives and benefits

This project improves efficiency of the transportation network specifically related to local and inter-regional public transit vehicles in the Mississauga City Centre. Providing priority to public transit will attract additional transit ridership and reduce automobile trips, with the aim of ultimately reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Redevelopment will address current deficiencies in the areas of accessibility, safety and energy consumption. Work will include resurfacing the floors in high traffic areas, adding non-slip coating to floors, and reduced energy consumption through more efficient power and communication routing.

Project details

  • Estimated cost: $2.7 million
  • Project management: SMG Canada
  • Architect: Parkin Architects
  • Contractor: PCL Contractors

Background

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain infrastructure for its citizens and for generations to come. A sound, functional and attractive infrastructure is integral in completing its neighbourhoods, as we build a City for the 21st century.

The Hershey Centre SportZone is the City’s major public assembly facility, comprised of a 5,400 seat spectator arena, a three ice pad community arena, indoor regulation soccer field, triple gymnasium, gymnastics centre, outdoor sport fields and expansive parking area. It is home to Mississauga cultural and sports organizations, boasting an attendance of over 3 million users per year.

Since it opened in 1998, there have been minimum requirements for facility design and long-term Capital upgrades. Today’s more stringent standards have resulted in the need to upgrade multiple components of the Hershey SportZone’s infrastructure, such as installation of power and communications throughout the complex to improve public safety and meet a range of new activities; redevelopment and construction of public facility operation areas including equipment and fixtures; upgrading the kitchen; painting, flooring and other improvements in the public and back-of-house areas. Redevelopment will extend the lifecycle of the facility while correcting deficiencies in safety and accessibility.

Objectives and benefits

As host of the 2011 Memorial Cub and the combative arts competition of the 2015 Pan/Parapan American Games, the Hershey SportZone will see a dramatic increase in attendance. Redevelopment will address current deficiencies in the areas of accessibility, safety and energy consumption. Benefits of this redevelopment, to the community include: the ability to better serve Mississauga’s aging population by resurfacing the floors in high traffic areas and adding non-slip coating to floors; reduced energy consumption through more efficient power and communication routing; increase usability by the community through improvements to technical and production areas; increase ability for multi-lingual messaging to facilitate use by multicultural groups.

Details and project schedule for the redevelopment of Civic Square (now known as Celebration Square).

Background

According to the City of Mississauga’s Strategic Plan, one of the City’s strategic goals is to build and maintain its infrastructure for its citizens and for generations to come. A sound, functional and attractive infrastructure is integral in completing its neighbourhoods, as we build a City for the 21st century.

The City’s Civic Square is the premier location for large events, connecting residents and community groups through arts, culture and heritage. The “My Mississauga” Events Program including Canada Day attracted over 250,000 residents in 2008.

Existing physical and mechanical infrastructure including the outdoor skating rink, fountain, waterfall and waterproof membrane are at life expectancy. Constructed as two separate spaces separated by City Centre Drive, the square is not capable of supporting large events. Performance infrastructure including stage, sound and lighting are inadequate.

Project details

Objective and benefits

The City Centre has seen significant residential growth over the past five years creating a more vibrant downtown. Revitalization of the square has been proposed following extensive public consultation. An aging infrastructure will be replaced, including the skating rink and fountain and the Civic Square will be developed as an outdoor community centre with amenities to support “My Mississauga” cultural and heritage events. Based on the design concept, the square is expected to achieve recognition as one of the great public spaces in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA).

The principles of placemaking have been incorporated in the design. The plan provides for one large square, an interactive water feature converting to a skating rink in winter, a permanent stage with performance infrastructure, a market area to support cultural events, and upgrades to the amphitheatre to address deficiencies.
A linear digital media wall in line with the permanent stage will support events, provide interactive art capability and opportunity for commercial advertising. The design will incorporate improved access to City Hall and linking of events on the square to the Great Hall and the Central Library.

Design concepts and features

One Larger Square

  • Link the two squares together by removing sections of existing walls at the southern edge of the Civic Square and improving the grade transitions by redesigning the steps from the Square to the City Centre Drive Boulevard
  • Redesign City Centre Drive as a street through a pedestrian precinct to serve as a route that moves vehicular traffic that can be easily closed during event programming

Expansion of the Skating Rink

  • Double the size of the existing ice surface on the square and replace the existing outdated ice refrigeration unit with new dependable ice-making technology to allow a longer skating season and greater certainty to maintain ice during the season

Interactive Water Feature

  • Replace the existing reflecting pool on the Civic Square with a zero-edge water feature, meaning that the surface of the new water feature will be at the same grade as the surrounding square, using recessed water jets provided, thereby maximizing flexible use and programming of the square

Redeveloped Amphitheatre

  • Open up the amphitheatre by removing walls that currently separate it from the square and raising the low floor to connect it with the redesigned square; construct washrooms and a greenroom to support regular event programming for up to 350 people and install a permanent shade structure

Large Open Lawn

  • Reconfigure the lawn surface on the Central Library Square at a level grade condition with proper drainage to host activities

Permanent Stage

  • Develop a permanent outdoor stage with a sound system at the southern boundary of the Central Library Square to support My Mississauga event programming and all major event programming year round. This location would require the removal of the existing water fountains.

Media Wall

  • Install a media wall along the southern boundary of the Central Library Square, which could incorporate programmable and interactive digital arts

Market Area

  • Establish an area for a variety of specialized seasonal open air markets with approximately 40 vending stalls on the Central Library Square (a section of the market area will be protected by a permanent open-sided roof structure – any new market development would be done in consultation with the Mississauga Central Lion’s Club

Status

December 2011

Information below is current as of the date identified. Information, including the date and status for each phase may change throughout the project. Updates will be posted once a month.

Project timeline

  • Consultant & contractor awarded, July 2009 – Complete
  • Design development, August 2009 to March 2010 – Complete
  • Project presentations, August 2009 to December 2009 – Complete
  • Demolition tender – August 2009, – Complete
  • Mobilization to site, September 2009 – Complete
  • Construction start, October 2009 – Complete
  • Construction completion, May 30, 2011 – Complete
  • Open to the public, June 8, 2011 – Complete
  • Official opening event, June 22, 2011 – Complete